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Ger

What font is used by German game publisher W&SB?

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Ger


In order to date an end 19th, begin 20th, century German game of Go-Bang, the only thing I seem to have is the typeface of the numbers 1,2,3 and the lower case "a" on the box.

Could someone please recognize the type and date, or period, of use?

I have searched using several online methods on the peculiar digit "1" and the lower case "a" with no succes. They simply don't come up with anything near.

By the way, WS&B stands for Werner and Schumann, a German publisher of games and toys from at least 1879 to 1925.

With a loupe I had a closer look at the lower case "a". Please find a crude reconstruction of what it looks like. No, not a "G". I would say Jugendstil?

 

W&SB numbers.txt.jpg

cijfers-1a.png

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Ralf Herrmann

Looks like lettering, in which case you won’t be able to identify typefaces or narrow down when this was made. 

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Ger
9 minutes ago, Ralf Herrmann said:

Looks like lettering, in which case you won’t be able to identify typefaces or narrow down when this was made. 

Thanks for your comment.

The letters did leave an impression in the paper.

Furthermore in the sequence 2131/31a the last digit 1 is placed lower. That would not be done when lettered I think? Would this "1" be a slightly misplaced lead type?

Still when lettered there might be a similar typeface that served as an example...

 

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Ralf Herrmann

Can you show the full page? I am not quite sure what I am seeing there. 

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Ger

OK, here is the full box. The letters Go-Bang are embossed too (that is, they lie deeper). The decoration is not.

599c5bb29684d_SAM_6755doos.JPG.b9c52165dd8fe2575b14f84581d70139.JPG

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Ralf Herrmann

Still doesn’t look like a typeset design to me. What are those number anyway? Is it like a serial number to identify the game or each individual package?

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Ger

Yes, they are serial numbers or rather identification numbers. These represent game 2131 and version 2131a.

For what it's worth I do recall having seen this type of digit "1" in an old book long ago, but can't recall where...  So that does not help much. The type "a" only struck me a few days ago, I had not noticed it for months. Could it be some jugendstil version of a gothic type? ( I like it). Searching google for that did not help.

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Ger

Sorry now I understand what you meant by serial number. No it is not a number for each individual copy, but for each different set of games. In this case a box that can hold game type 2131 or 2131a

.

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Florian H.

One can find a similar ‘a’ in Künstlerschrift (F. Schweimanns for D. Stempel, 1901). So yes, Jugendstil sounds about right for the period.

Kuenstlerschrift-Stempel.png.29d9f082722d89dc6bdfd026f335d915.png

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Ger
2 hours ago, Florian H. said:

One can find a similar ‘a’ in Künstlerschrift (F. Schweimanns for D. Stempel, 1901). So yes, Jugendstil sounds about right for the period.

Kuenstlerschrift-Stempel.png.29d9f082722d89dc6bdfd026f335d915.png

That is great!

And the year would fit very well with the time I suspected for this game.

There is a slight difference. However. Too much of a coincidence if the numerals would be similar as well... so are they to be found there as well?

This pdf has a whole page with examples, but no numerals...

http://www.klingspor-museum.de/KlingsporKuenstler/Schriftdesigner/Schweimanns/FSchweimanns.pdf

 

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Ralf Herrmann

The figures of Künstlerschrift don’t look like the ones in your example. 

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Ger

Nevertheless it is the only type I have seen with an opening at that spot in the "a" but for some "handwritng" types. And both have a jugendstil look. The shape of  "1" in Künstlerschrift would be interesting to see. Would it be in "Hauptprobe der Schriftgiesserei D. Stempel"? Or is that simply the pdf page given above?

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Ralf Herrmann
10 minutes ago, Ger said:

 The shape of  "1" in Künstlerschrift would be interesting to see. Would it be in "Hauptprobe der Schriftgiesserei D. Stempel"? 

Yes, the figures are visible in there. 

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Florian H.

Bavaria is another non-script Jugendstil face with an ‘a’ that is open at the top right. It is less similar, though.

The numerals look like they could belong to (or were based on) (Neue) Schwabacher, first cut by Albert Anklam in 1876 for Genzsch & Heyse. There are numerous versions, by virtually all German type foundries, with differences large and small. Gerhard Helzel’s digitization named Schwabacher (1996–97) based on an unspecified source features numerals that come close, see the image below. So does Dieter Steffmann’s freebie Yonkers (2001). These Schwabachers were in common use for several decades, so unfortunately this won’t really help you with dating the game.

Schwabacher-Romana.png

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Ger

Indeed, the Schwabacher numerals are the same. 1, as well as 2 and 3.

That leaves the Jugendstil "a" to put a narrower date to it.

Ralf: what is the "1" like in the Hauptprobe for Künstlerschrift?

Does it have types with similar "a"?

 

Edited by Ger
as well as 2 and 3

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Riccardo Sartori

Was the sans serif logo in use since 1879?

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Ger

Riccardo Sartori, yes it was found like that on "Tram-spel" from around 1880.

From another source I now know that the W&S B existed from 1841 to 1930

 

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