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  2. Gecko

    ANSWERED Fonts from Cochrane Automotive

    Cochrane is "Freestyle Script Bold" from Letraset/Fontex Automotive is "City Bold" from Berthold.
  3. Ralf Herrmann

    Kerning lower case and font letter spacing

    No, it is not a “fact”. They are properly spaced in regards to the approach their type designers used. Since you came up with your own approach, that probably no other punch cutter, type designer, or typographer has ever used, of course they will not meet your expectation, but that doesn’t mean that you can define for a fact what proper spacing is or isn’t. That would be incredibly arrogant. And we don’t need more PDFs. You want to space letterform distances. We get it. And since you reject the reasoning for the current practice of spacing anyway, you can at least learn from this discussion, that equal area spacing is the reason why most fonts behave the way they do. Not sure where else we would go from here.
  4. Hi. My friend is a stone carver and is carving some lettering using the typeface attached. The trouble is she can’t find or identify the typeface, neither can she recall the book she found these pages in. Without it she won’t be able to complete the carving. It looks mildly italic and may be German because of the accents over some letters? I’m hoping someone will be able to help. Thanks Jon
  5. Today
  6. I was wondering if anyone new what the two types of font are in this picture. Sorry for it not being a very clear picture being as it is on aluminum. If you have any ideas I would greatly appreciate it. Thank you in advance for your help
  7. Yesterday
  8. Melchior

    Kerning lower case and font letter spacing

    Yes, I do reject it. It has no empirical basis. We don't read spaces and compare their areas, consciously or subconsciously. We read letters, especially the tops of letters, as studies have shown. Regardless, it is a fact that no font is properly spaced with regard letter combinations such as VW, dF, dAhinlmk, which should all be equally spaced. Please look at the attached file, which compares my modified Aldus with Palatino Linotype. Note the combination Se, which is too tight in Palatino. Again, observe in Palatino the sequence sty in the word Dynasty: the t is too close to the y and too far from the s, and the same thing occurs in the sequence its in the word deposits. The letters ao in Pharaoh are too loose, as are the letters de. Bear in mind that Aldus is a little narrower than Palatino Linotype. Lest we forget the italics, please look at the other attachment (Phar2) to see how the letters rw in Underworld are nearly touching in Palatino. Phar.pdf Phar2.pdf
  9. “Welcome to our twelfth annual celebration of new type design. These are not necessarily the “best” typefaces, nor the most popular or top-selling (the big retailers already have that covered). What can be said is that each of these 2017 releases inspired at least one admirer among our distinguished group of designers, educators, and enthusiasts to take time away from their day jobs and pen their personal praises.”
  10. Ralf Herrmann

    Woodside Press

    Woodside Press is a traditional letterpress printing studio located in New York City's historic Brooklyn Navy Yard. They create printed items for individual, business, and institutional clients. To the graphic-design community they offer typesetting and type-reproduction services, and they are also New York City's leading facility for hot-metal typography, with Linotype and Ludlow typecasting machines and an impressive range of classic and decorative typefaces. Woodside Press began in 1993 in Woodside, Queens, and moved in 1998 to their current home, with a spectacular view of the Manhattan skyline, in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. They have built a collection of late 19th and 20th century printing type, including foundry type to set by hand, a huge variety of wooden type for posters and headlines, and an array of Linotype and Ludlow hot-metal typefaces.
  11. Ralf Herrmann

    Looking for the font for Aussie Bar

    Futura Bold Condensed download at MyFonts
  12. Hi, Can anyone identify the font for a nightclub Aussie Bar? Thanks,
  13. Albert-Jan Pool

    Opinions about Sans Forgetica

    Striking typefaces such as Sans Forgetica may be of help to make something stand out in relation to a running text, set in a ‘normal’ and legible typeface. Creating visual hierarchy between important and less important text or words and sentences to remember and background information is essential to typography. Normally this is done by using italic and/or bolder weights of the text typefaces, or when needed setting it in a larger size. By not setting all text in the same legible typeface at the same legible size, but by carefully creating a visual hierarchy between the different kinds of texts, we can make typography readable. Meaning to say that by using less legible typefaces such as bolder and italic weights, or even all-caps setting, which is less legible too, we can enhance the readability of a text. Forgetica takes this to an extreme. It is not legible, we would never set a long reading text in such a typeface. But it stands out and draws attention, so the information displayed through Forgetica draws more attention. Yes, there seems to be some proof that we remember information better when read in a less legible typeface. But as said before here, this goes for a lot of other weird typefaces too. And also there is no proof that Forgetica would perform better than other typefaces for which the same seems to be true. Like Haettenschweiler in the case Kevin Larson (Microsoft) presents here in his talk at ATypI Antwerp at 0.20h: On the other hand, one of the things argued here in this talk is that when information is displayed in a non-legible typeface, the expectations of the reader concerning the complexity of that information also change. Not surprisingly, in a negative way … So the may even be a drawback of a typeface such as Sans Forgetica. When it takes a reader more time to read something, that information may be remembered better, but when the reader perceives that information as more complicated than other information, it becomes questionable wether typefaces such as Haettenschweiler, Brush Script (als discussed in the talk by Kevin Larson) and Sans Forgetica are of any help at all in really transferring information.
  14. Good evening, this is printed on paper bags on local grocery store can you please help me to identify the font used? Thank's in advance. Regards
  15. Riccardo Sartori

    The Typographic Ticket Book

    I am sure that in real life gold foil on marbled blue looks terrific, but it looks pretty crappy in photos. Also, perhaps not so funny either.
  16. Ralf Herrmann

    The Typographic Ticket Book

    “By special issue from the 100% totally real Typographic Violations Division, the Uniform Ticket Book is standard equipment for the modern design enforcer. Lists thirty-two common design infractions, each with an appropriate penalty, with plenty of room for improvisation.”
  17. Ralf Herrmann

    Kerning lower case and font letter spacing

    So the discussion can end here. Speaking for 99 % of our field over a course of centuries: Of course it aids reading. But since you will reject that anyway, it would be a waste of time trying to make that case. Your claim “not a single digital font is properly spaced and kerned” was a bold and therefore interesting one and we quickly narrowed down, what the cause for this view is: Your rejection of the equal area principle. This is as far as we can go.
  18. Last week
  19. Melchior

    Kerning lower case and font letter spacing

    Although I am rarely critical of tradition, that would not surprise me at all. Ralf, I have read many such books. Some of them are wrong. Robert Bringhurst's book (Elements of Typographic Style) is full of nonsense. https://medium.com/re-form/a-refutation-of-the-elements-of-typographic-style-3b18c07977f3 The clashing of letters is inexcusable, as are big gaps. Digital typesetting allows us to avoid these sins. There should be an equal space between the 'eastern' and 'western' parts of the letters (serifs) when they are close vertically (e.g., ar, VW, AB, nm, dhinmAmH). In the case of letter combinations where the serifs are not close vertically (e.g., db, dp, du, hu, iu, au, mu, nu) I draw them in a little (-12) and that seems to look better. I have taken some pieces of text from various web sources and combined them. These have a wide variety of words (Egyptian Pharaohs and scientific names, among others). This helps find unusual combinations for kerning. See attached. It is set in Aldus (modified by me). You should find it illustrates what I am trying to accomplish. I reject out of hand the notion of 'equal area', as it provides no benefit for reading; and this is what good typesetting should aim for. I am sure we have all seen books set in sans-serif types and been repulsed by this abomination. Whenever I see something set in an Egyptian type, I know I'm being lied to. entailing corresponding differences in their skulls.pdf
  20. Ralf Herrmann

    Kerning lower case and font letter spacing

    You must be kidding. Read any typography or type design book. Take any typography type design class. Ask any respected type designer. You will always get the same answer what even spacing is. And it is the one I gave you. Correct. But you would have to demonstrate how even areas of space impede reading, not just assert it or label it “geometry”. Good luck with that. You are going up against 500 years of type design and probably 99 % of all living type designers.
  21. Melchior

    Kerning lower case and font letter spacing

    The 'area' between the letterforms is irrelevant. The distance between the closest parts matters. I read a lot, and poorly spaced letters are common. It's tiring. The combo 'rn' easily looks like 'm'. I know about ligatures, but many fonts were designed without them (Palatino was designed to set well without them.) The Garamond Pro sample you provided looks awful. The spacing should facilitate reading, not impede it. This is not an exercise in geometry, but to facilitate ease of reading. We don't read spaces, but letters. The area under the curve belongs to mathematics, not reading.
  22. Ralf Herrmann

    Kerning lower case and font letter spacing

    In this case, I am concluding you are the single wrong-way driver who complains about the hundreds of cars coming his way from the “wrong” direction. 😉 Or in other words: If every single font looks wrong to you, then probably you have different understanding of how spacing should be done. And we already nailed down a specific problem, which is even more clear from your latest PDF. You did not improve the f-i spacing — you made it worse. Look at the space between the “i-f” and the “f-i” between the baseline and the x-height. Those two should be as equal as the letterforms permit. Yet, you made the right one huge, and thus, created the uneven spacing yourself. It’s not just a little bit uneven. The right area is almost twice as big as the left one! Even spacing means an even flow of the stems and the spaces between them. We don’t “measure” how close serifs get for example. They can even overlap, as it is not uncommon with letters with diagonals (such as w/v). The clash – especially with copy text – is a smaller problem then the huge gap it would create without the overlap. download at MyFonts And if it gets really bad, then there are ligatures. That’s why an f-i close encounter doesn’t matter much, since it would usually be replaced by an f-i ligature.
  23. Melchior

    Kerning lower case and font letter spacing

    Ralf: This holds true for every font I have looked at. The spacing is uneven. Kerning/spacing should give a perfect result, with no gaps or clashes. I used Linotype Trajanus Type 1, purchased from Linotype around 1997. I did it again, showing you the result in the attachment. I used Open Office instead of Word this time, but results are similar. Note how the c and i in society almost clash, and the t and y do clash, in the unmodified version. The only way to achieve perfect spacing is by making nearly all the sidebars equal and identical. Only f, j and maybe y need be different. Then, all combinations of upper-case and lower case will space perfectly when foot serifs or top serifs are involved (e.g., VW, dl, Ah, dM, nm, lk). Kerning will take care of the others. Trajanus-Specimen2.pdf
  24. Ivo

    FF Quadraat no longer on the market?

    You should be able to get help using the mentioned email address.
  25. Ralf Herrmann

    Kerning lower case and font letter spacing

    Well, preventing that is not necessarily an objective for spacing/kerning. Evening out the space between the letters is the goal. And what version did you use exactly? What is labelled “unmodified” in your PDF does indeed look weird — but checking Trajanus on MyFonts I do not get what your PDF is showing. download at MyFonts
  26. I have found that not a single digital font is properly spaced and kerned. Not one! I am revising some fonts that I have obtained, and have found it necessary to kern lower case letters. All capitals should have symmetrical side-bearings, as should most lower-case letters (except f, j, and sometimes y). See the attachment. I have modified Trajanus to my taste. See how cramped the word 'justified' is in the second (unmodified) sample. The t and i almost clash, as do the f and i. Most of the other letters are too loosely spaced. Modified Trajanus.pdf
  27. The Kontiki typeface digitally simulates a handmade woodprint, but is less expensive to produce and easier to correct. To create the Kontiki fonts, 193 glyphs were manually cut into five wooden plates and carefully printed by hand. From countless test prints, the most charming four were selected and digitized. For each of the 560 characters, the font features four different qualities of print and designer the possibility to create a printed image that is very close to a traditional woodcut.
  28. Ralf Herrmann

    FF Quadraat no longer on the market?

    No, it doesn’t say anything about FontFonts.
  29. Greg Yerbury

    FF Quadraat no longer on the market?

    The answer is here
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