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Unfinished list № 1: typefaces for cities

Not just inspired by cities, or showing just one aspect of them, however iconic. But expressly commissioned by municipalities or, in any case, designed to represent the “spirit” of the whole city.

I also think to have seen a fairly recent one, for an Eastern European city, made available for free download by its designer, but I can’t remember where.

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Unfinished list № 2: typefaces drawn with unusual means

I would include only actual fonts (so, no bacteria this time, perhaps in a different list), containing graphemes (so no ferrofluid either).

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On 10/8/2016 at 1:25 AM, Riccardo Sartori said:

Unfinished list № 1: typefaces for cities

The presentation of a talk from the latest TypeCon prompted me to do some more research, that led to a nice article in The Guardian.

So, here are the new entrants:

 

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Unfinished list № 4: the past that never was: the stressed constructivist alphabets

One of the main stylistic features of the Bauhaus and other European avant-gardes of the early twentieth century, whether it is graphic design, furniture, architecture, or even weaving, was the contrast between thick lines and thinner lines.

Yet, when it comes to typographic exploration, they produced mostly a bunch of monolinear sans serifs.

Here are some modern explorations that could have been at home on a Bauhaus poster or a constructivist manifesto (at least in an alternate timeline).

  1. Modern Modern;
  2. Geostar Fill (and Geostar);
  3. Calzoleria;

 

 

 

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Unfinished list № 5: fonts that use OpenType ligature (or other) features for something other than ligatures

There are at least two sub-genres here:

  1. something purposely useful, like Chartwell or Datalegreya;
  2. something gimmicky, often with some kind of message, like Common Sans or Scunthorpe Sans (and others that I can’t remember now).

In any case, especially for the latter genre, because they need to be based on lists of words to substitute, they “work” only for the language(s) chosen by their designers. The same problem exist for fonts that use ligature features in a relatively more standard way, like Hangulatin.

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