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Found 6 results

  1. Ralf Herrmann

    Typography in OS X El Capitan and Pages

    I received this via email, but I guess it’s best discussed more publicly:
  2. Ralf Herrmann

    Apple explains the extended San Francisco Type Family

    Apples search for a fitting and consistent typography is an ongoing quest. Lucida Grande defined the look of Mac OS X since 2001, while the iPhone uses Helvetica. But Apple’s corporate typeface used in ads, on the web or on packaging is a version of Myriad. Lately, Mac OS X took over Helvetica from iOS, while a completely new typeface appeared for the Apple Watch: San Francisco. With the upcoming releases of Mac OS X and iOS yet another change was announced. The watch font is now renamed to “SF Compact” and iOS and Mac OS will use a new branch of the San Francisco type family called “SF”. The SF branch is a compromise between the current use of Helvetica and Apples own watch font design. SF uses the same metrics and proportions as Helvetica, but borrows design features from the watch font. The main difference between SF and SF Compact is the treatment of the curves. While they are rounded in the SF branch, they are rather flat in the SF Compact branch. This gives the latter a more legible appearance on smaller screens, such as on the Apple Watch. The fonts currently cover extended Latin, Cyrillic and Greek. Both branches of the San Francisco type family come with optical sizes. There are 6 weights (including italics) for the text sub-family and 11 weights for the display sub-family (without italics). The correct choice for the optical sizes and the tracking values can be made automatically by the operating system. The fonts are also equipped with smart font replacement options like subscript/superscript figures, different figure sets (including variations for the figures 6 and 9), as well as special versions of punctuation and math characters which better suit all-caps or number settings. Numbers with a centered colon Conclusion: It’s good to see that Apple now has in-house type designers who create this extensive family and pay great attention to details. I also like that advanced features such as optical sizes are not only available in the font family, but can be automatically applied throughout the system. The look of the typeface itself is unfortunately rather bland. Apple is known for creating trends rather than following them. This design mix of typefaces such as Helvetica or Akkurat can’t really achieve this. It doesn’t have its own clear voice and doesn’t separate Apple’s UI from that of competitors such as Google who use a pretty similar font. An open question is the use of Myriad as a corporate font. Mixing Myriad and San Francisco doesn’t seem like a good idea. The fonts are different, but not different enough to be a good mix. So will San Francisco become the corporate font as well someday? The great variety of styles would certainly allow it. The full presentation (around 30 minutes) from the developer conferenced can be watched here. The fonts are available free of charge for Apple developers. But I would like to point out, that the fonts are currently only licensed for the development of apps for Apple devices. The fact that you might find these fonts for free on certain websites does not mean that you can use them like regular freeware or Open Source fonts.
  3. Ralf Herrmann

    RightFont

    RightFont is a simple app for Mac OS X for choosing fonts. Main features: Instant access from any app through the menu bar Star rating system to find favourite fonts easily Create & manage font collections (coming soon) Direct access for apps like Adobe Photoshop, Sketch, Etc. Instant search results as you type Change font preview & font size in realtime automatic categorization by font style and width
  4. Ralf Herrmann

    PopChar

    PopChar is a commercial character map tool for Windows (PopChar Win) and Mac OS (PopChar X). Main features: Inserts special characters right into your document. Full Unicode support with different comfortable views and pop-up menu for quick navigation. Search for characters by name, by Unicode number or by simply pasting some text from your document into the search field. Find characters by drawing their shapes. Find similar characters. Font preview and sample text views Font information View and print font sheets Individually adjust the sizes of certain fonts. Custom favorites section provides quick access to frequently used characters. Magnifier tool provides an enlarged view to see selected characters in full detail. Work across font boundaries and see all available characters system-wide. “Reverse search” for fonts that contain a particular character. Recent characters view for instant access to your frequently used characters.
  5. Ralf Herrmann

    Apple Character Viewer

    The Character Viewer is the character map tool that is bundled with Mac OS X. It allows to access Unicode-encoded characters and it shows which installed fonts include the chosen character. The recent versions don’t support a font-specific glyph overview anymore, so PUA glyphs and unencoded glyphs are not supported. The Character Viewer can be accessed through “Edit > Special Characters” in supported apps, through the shortcut “Control Command Space”, or by adding it globally to the menu bar (see screenshot below).
  6. Ralf Herrmann

    Ultra Character Map

    Ultra Character Map lets you access any character or glyph in any font and use it in other apps. It also lets you do side-by-side font comparisons, print font catalogs, view detailed character and font information (including the keystroke combinations that produce special or accented characters). Main Features: Access any character, symbol or glyph in any font and use it in your documents. Create your own clip art by applying colors and 3D effects to any character, symbol or glyph. Ultra Character Map gives you access to all Emoji characters available in OS X. Enter text once, then simply scroll through a list to see a preview in every font. Don't want to look at all your fonts? You can filter the list by style, classification, collection or name. Ultra Character Map lets you preview header or paragraph text and includes preset samples to save you even more time. Print font catalogs and font samples. Ultra Character Map lets you print custom font catalogs, font samples and character maps or save them as PDF documents. Ultra Character Map shows all the glyphs in your fonts (even glyphs that are not associated with a character) and lets you view Bézier curves and copy them to other apps. It also features an HTML entity palette, a Unicode 6.1 grid and panels that display extensive character and font information.
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