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  1. Ralf Herrmann

    Type Specimens

    Type Specimens introduces readers to the history of typography and printing through a chronological visual tour of the books, posters, and ephemera designed to sell fonts to printers, publishers, and eventually graphic designers. This richly illustrated book guides design educators, advanced design students, design practitioners, and type aficionados through four centuries of visual and trade history, equipping them to contextualize the aesthetics and production of type in a way that is practical, engaging, and relevant to their practice. Fully illustrated throughout with 200 color images of type specimens and related ephemera, the book illuminates the broader history of typography and printing, showing how letterforms and their technologies have evolved over time, inspiring and guiding designers of today.
  2. Ralf Herrmann

    Mackellar, Smiths & Jordan

    This study of America’s leading type foundry of the nineteenth century, MacKellar, Smiths & Jordan, emphasizes the design of the hundreds of typefaces that were produced by the foundry, from its inception in the 1860s until its merger with most other American foundries at the end of the century. The author describes how changing business conditions and technical improvements in type founding interacted with changes in public taste over the decades to modify the appearance of American typefaces. While MacKellar, Smiths & Jordan is only one of many American foundries, it can stand as an exemplar of the rest. It was the descendant of the first successful American type foundry, Binny and Ronaldson, started in Philadelphia in 1796, and set many industry standards in business practice, manufacturing, and design. When taste turned away from ornamented type styles at the end of the nineteenth century, MacKellar, Smiths & Jordan’s output fell into obscurity. This study proposes that the earlier styles were very successful in their own time and should be judged on that basis. A completely illustrated appendix showing MS&J’s original typeface designs accompanies the text.
  3. Ralf Herrmann

    Helmut Salden Uncovered 1:1

    Helmut Salden Uncovered 1:1 is the first international monograph on Helmut Salden (1910–96), exploring his original sketches and working drawings. The material spans the years 1939 through 1970. In those years, Salden was the most celebrated Dutch lettering artist. All drawings are reproduced at actual size and reveal in detail his pursuit of the ultimate form. Helmut Salden Uncovered 1:1 by Mathieu Lommen & Karen Polder Language: English/German Pages: 80 Size: 16,3×23,4×1,9 cm Print run: 750 ISBN: 978-90-9033531-5 The book can be ordered directly from the publisher via email or from Typotheque: https://www.typotheque.com/books/helmut_salden_uncovered
  4. Ralf Herrmann

    Preorder: Manual of Diacritics book

    Case studies of newly designed accents for contemporary typefaces
  5. A book that investigates the relationship between gender stereotypes and letterforms, and what the design community can do about it.
  6. Przemysław Sakrajda

    Berlin typography

    One of reasons I love Berlin is typography. From its neon shopfronts to its distinctive U-Bahn signs, Berlin is filled with stunning typography and letterforms. I just received a book by Jesse Simon “Berlin typography”. Lovely published, with hundreds of photos, and text in both English and German. I pre-ordered it a year ago and completely forgot, so it is a really nice surprise. Publisher: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.de/Buch/Berlin-Typography-dt-engl-/Jesse-Simon/Prestel/e575253.rhd Twitter: https://twitter.com/Berlin_Type It’s available on Amazon
  7. Riccardo Sartori

    Support Independent Type

    A book about the New Culture of Type Specimens “A compendium of contemporary, physical and digital type specimens. The carefully selected work of over 400 font labels and type designers gives you a glimpse into the adventurous shift of this creative industry.”
  8. Riccardo Sartori

    Collection of Research on Chinese Typography

    “Chinese typography is not easy to tackle, but we believe that, by more self-initiated and open research, we are able to address our challenges under a global perspective and invite more discussions and breakthroughs to the field. So here is a three-volume collection of our on-going research and dialogues about typography and design in China, including its history and development, conventions and contemporary practice, and working in transcultural contexts.” Shanghai Type: a slice of modern Chinese type history Transcultural Type Design: a dialogue from China Kǒngquè: restoring the mindset of Chinese typesetting
  9. “Over my 19-year career as a designer, I’ve amassed quite a nice collection of books on typography. Some have been more useful than others.”
  10. Ralf Herrmann

    Type Directory

    Type Directory shows 1,500 typefaces are organized by category – Serif, Sans Serif, Display, Script and Symbols & Dingbats – and subsequently arranged by recognized sub-categories. This allows the reader to make a direct comparison of typefaces with a similar appearance, thus facilitating a deeper understanding of the design and selection process. A visual celebration of the craft, innovation and beauty of these letterforms is presented throughout, from classic typefaces like Garamond, Bodoni and Times through to the contemporary Bliss, Gotham and Meta. Author Peter Dawson co-founded his design practice, Grade, in 2000. He is a fellow and a former chair and board member of the International Society of Typographic Designers, and has also acted as a visiting typography lecturer at a number of universities.
  11. “For its third book, Letterform Archive is proud to announce Only on Saturday, a stunning tribute to Jack Stauffacher, a letterpress printer, typographer, and designer whose elegant and innovative type treatments cemented his reputation as one of the best printers of the twentieth century.”
  12. Ralf Herrmann

    Moholy-Nagy and the New Typography

    In 1929, ten years after the Bauhaus was founded, Berlin’s Martin-Gropius-Bau launched the exhibition “New Typography.” László Moholy-Nagy, who had left Dessau the previous year and had earned a reputation as a designer in Berlin, was invited to exhibit his work together with other artists. He designed a room—entitled “Wohin geht die typografische Entwicklung?” (“Where is typography headed?”)—where he presented 78 wall charts illustrating the development of the “New Typography” since the turn of the century and extrapolating its possible future. To create these charts, he not only used his own designs, but also included advertising prints by colleagues associated with the Bauhaus. The functional graphic design, initiated by the “New Typography” movement in the 1920s, broke with tradition and established a new advertising design based on artistic criteria. It aimed to achieve a modern look with standardized typefaces, industrial DIN norms, and adherence to such ideals as legibility, lucidity, and straightforwardness, in line with the key principles of constructivist art. This book showcases Moholy-Nagy’s wall charts which have recently been rediscovered in Berlin’s Kunstbibliothek. Renowned authors provide insights into this treasure trove by each contributing to this alphabetized compilation starting with “A” for “Asymmetry” and ending with “Z” for “Zukunftsvision” (“vision of the future”). By perusing through the pages and allowing a free flow of association, the typographical world of ideas of the 1920s avant-garde is once again brought back to life.
  13. “History of Desktop Publishing is a personal and encyclopedic story of how the personal computer, unique applications, and many colorful people changed the creative and print communities. Author Frank Romano has documented the histories of hot metal and phototypesetting and continues the tale of document production in this book. This installment ends as the Internet becomes a primary focus.”
  14. Ralf Herrmann

    Reviving Type released

    “Two studies, that started as a university course assignment and developed into an independent design-research, are woven together into one volume: one about the Renaissance letters of Garamont and Granjon, the other about the Baroque types of Nicholas Kis. The publication guides the reader from finding original sources in archives, through historical investigation and design process to the finished type.”
  15. Ralf Herrmann

    Reviving Type

    Reviving Type is a book by Céline Hurka and Nóra Békés. Two studies, that started as a university course assignment and developed into an independent design-research, are woven together into one volume: one about the Renaissance letters of Garamont and Granjon, the other about the Baroque types of Nicholas Kis. The publication guides the reader from finding original sources in archives, through historical investigation and design process to the finished typeface. The first part of the book provides insight into historical changes in type design through hands-on examples with theoretical background. The second part gives a thorough explanation of the production process of the revival typefaces. Here two different approaches are placed side by side, creating a conversation piece about possible working methods in type design. Design decisions, technical details and difficulties of the process are thoroughly discussed. Rich imagery of original archival material and technical illustrations explain the texts visually. Altogether, the publication becomes a ‘cookbook’ for anyone, who would like to dive into revival type design. http://www.revivingtype.com
  16. Ralf Herrmann

    Arcade Game Typography

    Arcade Game Typography presents readers with a fascinating new world of typography: the pixel typeface. Video game designers of the ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s faced color and resolution limitations that stimulated incredible creativity. With each letter having to exist in a small pixel grid, artists began to use clever techniques to create elegant character sets within a tiny canvas. This book presents typefaces on a dynamic and decorative grid, taking reference from high-end type specimens while adding a suitably playful twist. Arcade Game Typography recreates that visual aesthetic, fizzing with life and color. Featuring pixel typefaces carefully selected from the first decades of arcade video games, Arcade Game Typographypresents a completist survey of a previously undocumented outsider typography movement, accompanied by insightful commentary from author Toshi Omagari, a Monotype typeface designer himself. Gathering an eclectic range of typography, from hit games such as Super Sprint, Marble Madness, and Space Harrier to countless lesser-known gems, Arcade Game Typography is a vivid nostalgia trip for gamers, designers, and illustrators alike.
  17. Ralf Herrmann

    Dutch Type (2018 reprint)

    In ‘Dutch Type’, Jan Middendorp presents a comprehensive overview of type design and lettering in the Netherlands, tracing its origins through type designers and lettering artists from the 15th to the 20th centuries. Partly based on interviews, the book also offers insight into the motives and methods of the first generations of digital type designers, featuring published and unpublished typefaces as well as sketches, studies, and samples of lettering work. While the quest for quality and innovation has remained constant, it makes clear that the advent of desktop type has opened up the discipline to a more spontaneous, inventive, and democratic approach. Dutch Type was originally published in March 2004 and was received with huge enthusiasm. Its 3,500 copies sold out in 3 years. The book soon became hard to find and ended up being offered at embarrassingly high prices on Amazon, eBay and by antiquarians — between €400 and $800 for a copy. In 2018 author Jan Middendorp decided to self-publish a near-identical reprint, and successfully financed the production with crowdfunding.
  18. Ralf Herrmann

    W.A. Dwiggins: A Life in Design

    Often credited with inventing the term "graphic design," W. A. Dwiggins was a quintessential maker — fabricating his own tools, inventing techniques, and experimenting with design in areas as wide-ranging as modular ornament, stamps, currency, books, kites, marionettes, and theatrical sets and lighting. More than any of his contemporaries, he united the full range of applied arts into a single profession — designer. Despite this, a thorough study of Dwiggins has never been published. Until now. W. A. Dwiggins: A Life in Design offers an engaging and inspiring overview of the designer’s wide-ranging creative output and lasting impact on the graphic arts. Bruce Kennett’s careful research, warm prose, and inclusion of numerous personal accounts from Dwiggins’s friends and contemporaries portray not only a brilliant designer, but a truly likable character. The book can be ordered from the shop of the Letterform Archive.
  19. Ralf Herrmann

    Theory of Type Design

    Theory of Type Design by type designer Gerard Unger is a comprehensive theory of typeface design. This volume consists of 24 chapters, each describing a different aspect of type design, from the influence of language to today’s digital developments, from how our eyes and brain process letterforms to their power of expression. This book includes more than 200 illustrations and practical examples that illuminate the theoretical material. The terminology is explained in the volume’s extensive glossary. The theory is internationally orientated and relevant for typography courses, professionals and those with a general interest in text and reading all over the world.
  20. Riccardo Sartori

    Letraset:The DIY Typography Revolution

    Letraset: The DIY Typography Revolution is the first comprehensive history of Letraset, the rubdown lettering system that revolutionised typographic expression. The book tells the Letraset story from its early days as a difficult-to-use wet system, to its glory years as the first truly democratic alternative to professional typesetting. The book also looks at Letraset’s present-day revival amongst a new set of admirers who recognise the typographic excellence of the system’s typefaces. The book comes with a gatefold Letraset timeline. It has an introduction by Malcolm Garrett, and features in-depth interviews with Mr Bingo, Erik Brandt, Aaron Marcus, David Quay, Dan Rhatigan, Freda Sack, Andy Stevens and Jon Wozencroft. Essays by Colin Brignall, Dave Farey and Mike Daines – all key members of the Letraset team – provide expert insight into the rise of Letraset as a typographic and commercial powerhouse. A central essay by Adrian Shaughnessy examines the typographic and cultural impact of the system. The book’s design is by the Spin team of Tony Brook and Claudia Klat. It uses many rare specimens from Letraset’s past – catalogues, press ads, mailers, storage units, and of course, sheets of classic Letraset typefaces.
  21. Second book of Keith Houston after „Shady Characters”. „The Book” is about the paper, ink, thread, glue and board from which a book is made. It’s an amazing travel through history of this 2,000 year-old medium: from tablets and papyrus scrolls to hard covers and paperbacks we have today. It’s a must-have for anyone interested in history of book making, but also for editorial designers and printers.
  22. Ralf Herrmann

    Design School: Type

    Design School: Type is an instructive guide for students, recent graduates, and self-taught designers. You'll get a comprehensive introduction to typography, a crucially important skill that underpins practically every aspect of graphic design. These guided lessons offer in-depth analysis of all the major areas of theory and practice used by experienced professional designers. Each section is interspersed with tests designed to help you retain the information they've covered, and a selection of relevant support files in popular design software formats so you can test yourself with provided demos. This guide to the rules and practices of typography avoids the temptation to stray into other areas of design technique, preferring to cover the essential skills of the professional typographer in the detail required to arm students and graduates with the knowledge needed for a successful start to their chosen career. The author Richard Poulin is cofounder, design director, and a principal of Poulin + Morris Inc., an internationally recognised, multidisciplinary design consultancy located in New York City. His work has been recognized by major design organisations, competitions, and publications including the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA), Communication Arts, Graphis, Library of Congress, Type Director Club, and the New York Art Directors Club.
  23. Fifty Type Specimens is a collection of postcards with typographic images, for inspiration, correspondence, or display. Cards feature classic letterforms, pages from specimen books, and crops of letters presented in a box with the feel of an old specimen book. Historic typefaces, selected by renowned designer Tobias Frere-Jones, are organized into four geographic categories by thumb tabs: Germany, France, United States, and the United Kingdom.
  24. jpamental

    Responsive Typography

    Responsive web design helps your site maintain its design integrity on a variety of screen sizes, but how does it affect your typography? With this practical book, graphic designers, web designers, and front-end developers alike will learn the nuts and bolts of implementing web fonts well, especially how to get the best appearance from type without sacrificing performance on any device. After examining typography fundamentals and the evolution of type on the Web, author Jason Pamental provides useful approaches, real examples, code, and advice for making your type performant, progressive, proportional, and polished—the primary ingredients of responsive typography. Understand how type plays a vital role in content-first web design Weigh the tradeoffs between self-hosting and using a font service to get the best performance for your site Get your type on the screen fast by designing for Progressive Enhancement Use a responsive relative scale to adjust proportions between typographic elements for any device or resolution Polish your type with ligatures, kerning, and other techniques to create rich, textured reading experiences
  25. Ralf Herrmann

    The Visual History of Type

    The Visual History of Type is a comprehensive, detailed survey of the major typefaces produced since the advent of printing with movable type in the mid-fifteenth century to the present day. Arranged chronologically to provide context, more than 320 typefaces are displayed in the form of their original type specimens or earliest printing. Each entry is supported by a brief history and description of key characteristics of the typeface. This book will be the definitive publication in its field, appealing to graphic designers, educators, historians and design students. It will also be a significant resource for professional type designers and students of type. About the Author: Paul McNeil is a graphic designer with experience in corporate and brand communications. He is a co-founder of MuirMcNeil, specialising in typography, systems and information design, and works as a Senior Lecturer in Typography at the London College of Communication where he was Course Leader, MA Contemporary Typographic Media from 2010–15.
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